DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20164588

Clinical and laboratory profile of dengue fever in children during an outbreak - one year study at tertiary care hospital, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

Natwar Lal Sharma, Vasuki Balasubramanyam, Jithendra Kandati, Munilakshmi Ponugoti

Abstract


Background: Dengue fever is a mosquito borne arboviral disease which is of global concern. It is endemic in tropical countries with annual incidence of 7.5 to 32.5 million cases. It commonly affects the young adults and paediatric cases of Dengue haemorrhagic fever has high mortality. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical and laboratory profile and outcomes of dengue fever in children of less than 18 years of age. The study was conducted for a period of one year during an outbreak, in a tertiary care hospital of Chennai, Tamilnadu, India.

Methods: This was a prospective cross sectional study and 200 cases of dengue fever were enrolled and classified as per WHO guidelines. The clinical profile and demographic profile was recorded in a structured questionnaire form. Haematological parameters were recorded and followed till the day of discharge. The duration of stay was recorded and outcomes were noted.

Results: A total of 200 cases with 113 males and 87 females, 177 non severe dengue cases and 23 severe cases of dengue fever were classified. The mean age of admission was 9 years and mean duration of stay in hospital was 4.61 days. Fever was most common presenting symptom (100%) and hepatomegaly (58.5%) was common clinical finding. Bleeding manifestations were seen in severe dengue cases. Statistical significance was seen in rise in SGOT levels, rise in haematocrit and pleural effusion with severe dengue cases and non-severe dengue cases. The case fatality rate was zero.

Conclusions: Understanding the knowledge of presentations and associated features would help to predict the severity of the disease. In children, if symptoms like fever, pain, rashes, and vomiting are associated with Hepatomegaly and elevated SGOT in context of low total platelet count, a strong possibility of dengue fever is present, especially in an epidemic setting. Early suspicion and effective management can reduce the severity.


Keywords


Dengue fever, Dengue haemorrhagic fever, Haematocrit, SGOT

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