Determination of immunisation status of children between 2-5 years of age who attending to teaching institute with concern to both national immunization schedule and optional vaccines

Authors

  • Vudaga Hanshila Department of Paediatrics, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences, Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Himayatsagar Road, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Shaik Khadeer Department of Paediatrics, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences, Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Himayatsagar Road, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Syeda Sumera Department of Paediatrics, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences, Teaching Hospital and Research Centre, Himayatsagar Road, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20241352

Keywords:

Expanded programme on immunisation, Vaccination, Socioeconomic status

Abstract

Background: In order to know the causes for non-immunisation, search for societal reasons for primary immunisation along with evaluating coverage. Aim of this current study is to determine the immunisation status of children between 2-5 years of age who are attending teaching health care centre with concern to both National Immunisation Schedule and Optional vaccines.

Methods: Study analysed the children's immunisation status, factors affecting their immunisation coverage, and reasons for partial or incomplete immunisation. The information was obtained from the parents using a questionnaire. Information such as socio-demographic variables, immunisation status, causes of their partial immunisation and lack of immunisation. The "vaccination card and the recall" approach was used to determine the recipient's immunisation status.

Results: Study found that 70.4% of children had received all recommended vaccinations. Lack of information and ignorance are significant contributors to under-immunization. Other statistically significant contributing factors for the low immunisation coverage include female gender, rural background, low socioeconomic status, born at home, lower mother age, and being from a joint household. BCG vaccination coverage was higher than pentavalent vaccine coverage, probably because of multiple doses needed. Only 77% of kids received vitamin A solution.

Conclusions: Paediatrician should mention the next vaccination date and dose at each appointment in order to lower the vaccination dropouts. Parents should be informed regarding the date of vaccination of their child through SMS message, calls, and social media groups.

References

Ranjan M, Dwivedi LK, Mishra R, Sharma B. Infant mortality differentials among the tribal and non-tribal populations of Central and Eastern India. Int J Popul Stud. 2016;2(2):26-43.

Programme report 1995: Global Programme for Vaccines and Immunization. Available at: https://www.who.int. Accessed on 20 November 2023.

Infant mortality reduction activities for the VI five year Dian in India (1980-85 Planning commission, Government of India. Available at: https://www.centre forpublicimpact.org/case-study/reducing-child-mortality-india/. Accessed on 20 November 2023.

Park K. Park's textbook of Preventive and Social Medicine. 2nd ed. Jabalpur: Banarsidas Bhanot Publishers; 2009:112.

Fenton SH, Smith DH. Evidence-based Operations Management in Health Information Management: A Case Study. Perspect Health Inf Manag. 2019;16:1.

Lahariya C. Health system approach for improving immunization program performance. J Family Med Prim Care. 2015;4(4):487-94.

Plotkin M. Vaccines. 2nd edn. Phldelphia: W. B. Saunder's; 1995.

Mathew JIL. Babbar I. Yadav S. Reasons for non-immunization of children in an urban, low Income group in North India. Trop Doct. 2002;3231:135-8.

Bhatia V. Swami HM. Rai SR. Gulati S. Verma A.children. Indian J Pediatr. 2004:71:313-5.

Mukanga OD. Factors affecting retention and use of child health card in slum unitv Kampala. Uganda. Maternal Child Health J. 2005;10:545-52.

Uwizihiwe JP, Bock H. 40th anniversary of introduction of Expanded Immunization Program: a literature review of introduction of new vaccines for routine childhood immunization in sub-Saharan Africa. Int J Vaccines Vaccin. 2015;1(1):4.

Dalal A, Silveria MP. Immunization status of children in Goa. Indian Pediatr. 2005;42(4):401-2.

Nawaz M, Rizvi S. The Determinants of Parental Uptake of Childhood Immunization in Peri-Urban Areas of Karachi-A Cross-Sectional Study. Pak J Med Health Sci. 2022;16(07):130.

Bholanath, Singh JV, Awasthi A, Bhusan V, Kumar V, Singh SK. A study on determinants of immunization coverage among 12-23 months old children in urban slums of Lucknow district, India. Indian J Med Sci. 2007;61(11):598-606.

Bhatia V, Swami HM, Rai SK, Gulati S, Verma A, Parashar A, et al. Immunization status in children. Indian J Pediatr. 2004;71(4):313-5.

Banerjee AV, Duflo E, Glennerster R, Kothari D. Improving immunisation coverage in rural India: clustered randomised controlled evaluation of immunisation campaigns with and without incentives. BMJ. 2010;340:20-9.

Bosch‐Capblanch X, Banerjee K, Burton A. Unvaccinated children in years of increasing coverage: how many and who are they? Evidence from 96 low‐and middle‐income countries. Trop Med Int Health. 2012;17(6):697-710.

Downloads

Published

2024-05-27

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles