Magnitude, risk factors and immediate outcome of external congenital anomalies in neonates in government Cuddalore medical college and hospital: an observational study

Authors

  • R. Ramanathan Department of Paediatrics, Government Cuddalore Medical College and Hospital, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India
  • M. Mahalakshmi Department of Paediatrics, Government Cuddalore Medical College and Hospital, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20240087

Keywords:

External congenital anomalies, Magnitude, Risk factors, Outcome

Abstract

Background: Despite the enormous incidence of congenital malformations in developing countries, there are presently few thorough data on these disorders because there are no birth defect registries. This study was conducted with objectives to determine the magnitude, risk factors and outcomes of external congenital anomalies in neonates born in government Cuddalore medical college and hospital.

Methods: The present study is an observational study. All the neonates born during the study period were included in our study and risk factors and outcome of 201 babies born with external congenital anomalies were analyzed in detail.

Results: The incidence of external congenital anomalies is 5.68% with 33% having major and 63% having minor anomalies. Among the major anomalies cleft lip and/or palate is the most common anomaly (5%) in our study. Overall sacral dimple is the most commonly observed external congenital anomaly (9.50%). Four-fifths of the newborns with external congenital anomalies were discharged. About 13% of the newborns with congenital anomalies expired.

Conclusions: A comprehensive package that includes preventive services, diagnostic, surgical or medical intervention, financial assistance, counselling, and psychosocial support, as well as follow-up treatments like rehabilitation, is required in combating the incidence of congenital anomalies.

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Published

2024-01-25

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Original Research Articles