DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20192786

Kangaroo mother care for low birth weight babies: supportive factors and barriers

Dinesh Mekle, Amit Kumar Kumar Singh, Jagdamba Dixit

Abstract


Background: Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is skin-to-skin contact between mother and low birth weight (LBW) baby. It keeps the baby warm, increases accessibility to breast feeding, and protects the baby from infections. This study was done to identify supportive factors and barriers in practicing KMC as perceived by mothers of LBW babies and health care personnel (HCP).

Methods: It was a questionnaire based descriptive study. Mothers of LBW babies and HCP were enrolled in study. Mothers and HCP were sensitized regarding KMC and after practicing KMC for 3 days, mothers were interviewed with the help of a predefined proforma. Feedback from the HCP was also taken. Data analysis was performed by using IBM SPSS ver. 20 software.

Results: Most common factor in initiation and practice of KMC were, knowledge regarding KMC after training (100%), environmental factors (privacy and resources) (87.27%) and support from HCP (94.54%). Most common barriers perceived during performance of KMC were lack of knowledge about KMC during pregnancy (80%), pain due to LSCS/episiotomy (64.54%) and lack of support from family members (51.81%). Majority of the HCP strongly agree that parents must be encouraged to adopt KMC (82.92%), KMC is hampered due to presence of visitors in the ward (73.17%). KMC needs separate room (68.29%) and it is difficult due to LSCS (51.21%).

Conclusions: To increase KMC practice, mother’s knowledge about KMC can be improved by educating them in antenatal clinics and all HCP should receive training on KMC.


Keywords


Barriers, HCP, KMC, LBW, Supportive factors

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References


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