Clinico-epidemiological spectrum of early onset neonatal sepsis in neonates admitted in NICU of a tertiary care institute

Authors

  • Ashwani Kumar Department of Pediatrics, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar, Punjab, India
  • Gursharan Singh Narang Department of Pediatrics, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar, Punjab, India
  • Gurmeet Singh Department of Pediatrics, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar, Punjab, India
  • Navneet Virk Department of Pediatrics, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar, Punjab, India
  • Ashiana Singh Department of Pediatrics, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar, Punjab, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20191071

Keywords:

Blood culture, Early onset sepsis, Sensitivity, Term neonates

Abstract

Background: Neonatal  sepsis  is  a  clinical syndrome  characterized by signs and symptoms  of  infection  with  or  without  accompanying  bacteremia  in  the  first  month  of  life. Neonatal  sepsis  may  be  classified  into  two  groups : early onset  sepsis and  late onset  sepsis . Early onset neonatal sepsis  is  generally  associated  with  the  acquisition  of  microorganisms  from  the  mother  and  usually  presents  with  respiratory  distress  and  pneumonia.

Methods: The study included one hundred  term  neonates with early onset neonatal sepsis. A septic screen including total leukocyte count, absolute neutrophil count, blood smear evaluation, blood cultures and C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed in all neonates with suspected sepsis to corroborate early onset sepsis diagnosis. Epidemiological parameters including gender of the neonate, mode of delivery, rural/urban residence were recorded in addition to clinical profile.

Results: Respiratory distress was the most common presentation in the form of tachypnea, seen in 63 (63.0%) neonates. In present study, Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism isolated followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumonae.

Conclusions: Early onset neonatal sepsis  was seen more in males. Among the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and among gram negative Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumonae were most common organisms to be isolated.

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Published

2019-04-30

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Original Research Articles