DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20180562

Nutritional status of infant and young children at a tertiary care hospital and factors affecting the nutritional status

Arvind Chavan, Shraddha Dubewar, Sarfaraz Ahmed, Saleem H. Tambe

Abstract


Background: Communicable diseases like acute respiratory infections and diarrhea are the major killer of less than five populations. This is especially true among those who are malnourished. Malnutrition is related to the increased morbidity and mortality due to diarrhea. The objective of this study was to study nutritional status of infant and young children at a tertiary care hospital and factors affecting the nutritional status

Methods: A hospital based cross sectional study was carried out. A total of 165 children were included in the study which comprised of 107 males and 58 females. The study was carried out for a period of one year. Anthropometric measurements and their interpretation were done as per WHO guidelines.

Results: Out of 165, 19 children were under weight and 3 were overweight. 143 children were well nourished according to the WHO standards. 18 were having wasting and two were obese. There was no significant difference in nutritional status of children in relation to education of their mothers; with respect to weight for age (p = 0.265) and height for age (p = 0.425). There was no difference in nutritional profile of bottle fed and non-bottle-fed children.

Conclusions: Majority of children (143/165) were well nourished. There was no difference in the nutritional profile of children among those of graduate and non-graduate mothers. There was no difference in nutritional profile of bottle fed and non-bottle-fed children.


Keywords


Factors, Infant, Nutritional status, Young children

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